BRS Brazilian Real

The Brazilian Real is said to have brought stability to Brazil`s economy after being introduced in 1994, replacing years of financial unrest and hyperinflation. Now, more than two decades later it is still considered to be solid.

Real (pronounced “rhe-AL”) means Royal and Real in Portuguese. In plural Real becomes Reais (“rhe-AIS”). The cash is divided into 100, 50, 20, 10, 5 and 2 R$ – notes. There is also a very rare 1 R$ note, but the 1 R$ coin is common. The coins are further divided into 100 Centavos with 50, 20, 10 and 5 centavos coin values.

Although you might have a credit card, you will find that many places prefer cash or do not accept cards at all. Getting to know the notes and coins are therefore very useful. They will take you around in bus or taxi, getting food on the corner or at the beach. But remember, when all is said and done, it`s only money.

 

R$ Coins

Coins of Rio.

 

REIAS and Coins

More of the notes and coins you will have to use in Rio.

Although money counterfeiting is not a huge problem in Brazil, it exists here as it does anywhere. And as a tourist you might be more likely to be handed a fake note than the locals. Clerks in stores normally check the high notes when receiving them, and so could you. The texture should have a certain roughness, and there are watermarks appearing when you hold them up to the light. You can use your fingernail to scratch and feel the subtle texture difference, like the area where there are short, straight lines in the lower corner of the note.

 

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